Noel Rose, MD | oneGRAVESvoice

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Researchers

Noel Rose, MD

Researcher
Senior Lecturer
Department of Pathology
Brigham and Women's Hospital
75 Francis St
Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Dr. Rose long has been associated with Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland where he has served as Professor and Chair of the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases and as Professor of Pathology and of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology and Founding Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Autoimmune Disease Research. Dr. Rose recently moved and is now in the Department of Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School as part-time Senior Lecturer of Pathology.

Dr. Rose holds degrees from Yale University (BS); University of Pennsylvania (A.M. and PhD); and State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo (MD), where he was chosen as the Distinguished Medical Alumnus in 1994. He also holds two honorary doctorates: Doctor “Honoris Causa” in Medicine and Surgery from the University of Calgari, Italy; and Doctor “Honoris Causa” in Biological Science from the University of Sassari, Italy.

Dr. Rose has published more than 880 articles in peer-reviewed journals, has edited or co-edited some 22 books, and has served as an editorial board member of more than 27 journals. He is a member of the Wayne State University Academy of Scholars. He also served as Chair of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Autoimmune Diseases Coordinating Committee.

 

Representative Publications:

Identification of a Shared Cytochrome P4502e1 Epitope Found in Anesthetic Drug-Induced and Viral Hepatitis

Autoimmune Diseases: Tracing the Shared Threads

Cloning and Characterization of Murine Thyroglobulin cDNA

Viruses as Adjuvants for Autoimmunity: Evidence From Coxsackievirus-Induced Myocarditis

A Novel Model of Drug Hapten-Induced Hepatitis With Increased Mast Cells in The BALB/C Mouse

Inflammatory Heart Disease: A Role for Cytokines

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