Updates on the Understanding and Management of Thyroid Eye Disease | oneGRAVESvoice

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Updates on the Understanding and Management of Thyroid Eye Disease

key information

source: Therapeutic Advances in Ophthalmology

year: 2021

authors: Clara J. Men, Andrea L. Kossler, Sara T. Wester

summary/abstract:

Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a complex disease associated with myriad clinical presentations, including facial disfigurement, vision loss, and decreased quality of life. Traditionally, steroid therapy and/or radiation therapy were commonly used in the treatment of active TED. While these therapies can help reduce inflammation, they often do not have a sustainable, significant long-term effect on disease outcomes, including proptosis and diplopia. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of TED have shifted the focus of treatment toward targeted biologic therapies. Biologics have the advantage of precise immune modulation, which can have better safety profiles and greater efficacy compared to traditional approaches. For instance, the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) has been found to be upregulated in TED patients and to colocalize with the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), forming a signaling complex.

Teprotumumab is an antibody targeted against IGF-1R. By inhibiting the IGF-1R/TSHR signaling pathway, teprotumumab may reduce the production of proinflammatory cytokines, hyaluronan secretion, and orbital fibroblast activation in patients with TED. Due to promising phase II and III clinical trial results, teprotumumab has become the first biologic US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of TED. In addition, there are currently ongoing studies looking at the use of antibodies targeting the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in various autoimmune diseases, including TED. FcRn functions to transport immunoglobulin G (IgG) and prevent their lysosomal degradation. By blocking the recycling of IgG, this approach may dampen the body’s immune response, in particular the pathogenic IgG implicated in some autoimmune diseases. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of TED, therefore, are leading to more targeted therapeutic options, and we are entering an exciting new phase in the management of TED. This review will cover recent insights into the understanding of TED pathophysiology and novel treatment options as well as ongoing studies of new potential treatment options for TED.

organization: Byers Eye Institute, USA; Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, USA

DOI: 10.1177/25158414211027760

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