Ken Kazahaya, MD, MBA, FACS | oneGRAVESvoice

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Healthcare Professionals

Ken Kazahaya, MD, MBA, FACS

Healthcare Professional
Co-lead Surgeon
Pediatric Thyroid Center
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
3401 Civic Center Blvd.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Ken Kazahaya is Associate Director of the division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Director of Pediatric Skull Base Surgery, Medical Director of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program, and Co-lead Surgeon in the Pediatric Thyroid Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He also has an appointment as Associate Professor of Cinical Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Kazahaya received his medical degree from University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine followed by internship in General Surgery and residency in Otorhinolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery) from University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He also completed his fellowship in Pediatric Otolaryngology from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and mini fellowship in Facial Plastics and Reconstructive Surgery from Oregon Health Sciences University. He is board certified in Otolaryngology.

Dr. Kazahaya specializes in otology, cochlear implantation, skull base surgery, thyroid surgery, pediatric head and neck oncology, and facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. He has been named by U.S. News & World Report as a Top Pediatric ENT-Otolaryngologist and, within this list, as an American Top Doctor in 2011. 

 

Representative Publications:

Surgical Management of Pediatric Thyroid Disease: Complication Rates After Thyroidectomy at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia High-Volume Pediatric Thyroid Center

Traumatic Perilymphatic Fistulas in Children: Etiology, Diagnosis and Management

Revisiting Outpatient Tonsillectomy in Young Children

Cervical Chordoma in a Patient With Tuberous Sclerosis Presenting With Shoulder Pain

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