Sandy Zhang-Nunes, MD | oneGRAVESvoice

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Healthcare Professionals

Sandy Zhang-Nunes, MD

Healthcare Professional
Assistant Professor
Keck School of Medicine
University of Southern California
Ophthalmology
HC4 4900 1450 San Pablo Street
Off Campus
Los Angeles, California, United States

Sandy Zhang-Nunes, MD, earned her undergraduate degrees at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her medical degree at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She, then, completed her ophthalmology residency at Jules Stein Eye Institute UCLA and completed a prestigious two-year American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery Fellowship based at Ophthalmic Surgeons and Consultants of Ohio in Columbus. Her clinical interests involve eyelid and eyebrow lifting surgeries for both cosmesis and functional reasons (blepharoplasty, ptosis surgery, endoscopic brow lifts), cosmetic lower eyelid, midface and full face surgery, reconstruction after Mohs (tumor) excisions, orbital disease, such as thyroid eye disease, tumors, fractures, eyelid malpositions from aging and congenital anomalies, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm, cosmetic laser and light therapy, Botox and fillers.

Dr. Zhang-Nunes’s research focuses on patients with thyroid eye disease. She also conducts studies related to imaging of eyelid and orbital structures, comparison of cosmetic neurotoxins, and dissolution rate of various hyaluronic acid gel fillers. Dr. Zhang-Nunes performs blepharoplasty and brow surgery corrections and studies their clinical outcomes.

 

Representative Publications:

Evolving Minimally Invasive Techniques for Tear Trough Enhancement

Minimally Invasive Options for the Brow and Upper Lid

Characterization and Outcomes of Repeat Orbital Decompression for Thyroid-Associated Orbitopathy

Late Central Visual Recovery After Traumatic Globe Displacement Into the Maxillary Sinus

Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Amyloid-Beta Peptide From Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Revealed by Quantitative in Vivo Imaging

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